Welcome to the  General Admission FyreCon classes schedule. The schedule will be updated as classes are confirmed with the instructors, so please check back often. We are excited to offer a wide array of classes for all writing and art levels.

We’re not putting the full schedule on this page alone because there is just too much awesomeness for one page to contain. Be sure to check all these places to see everything there is offered.

For Teen Classes, please check here.
For Master Classes, please check here.
For events and other activities, please see this page.
For the Thursday General Schedule, please check here.
For the Thursday Panel Schedule, please check here.
For the Friday General Schedule, please check here.
For the Friday Panel Schedule, please check here.
For the Saturday General Schedule, please check here.
For the Saturday Panel Schedule, please check here.
The schedule is subject to change until May 20th or in case of emergency.

Thursday Schedule

TimesBuilding D3
Room 203
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 206
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 207
Art
Building D3
Room 302
Building D3
Room 306
Writing Room 1
Building D3
Room 307
Writing Room 2
Building D3
Room 336
Subject Matter Expert(SME)
Building D3
Room 337
Writing Workshop
Building D3
Room 339
11:00 Registration (Lobby)
12:00 Registration (Lobby)
12:30 - 1:20



Everything You Need to Know About Writing & Selling Short Fiction
- M.K. Hutchins
Using Digital Media to Make Traditional Art
- Amberly Berendson
Take One for the Team:
Writing Team Fiction (Or What Marvel is Doing Right)
- C. Michelle Jefferies
Author with Anxiety
- Alyson Peterson
Future of Home Automation
- Myron Burnet
Research and Writing What You Don't Know
- Kevin Evans and Karen Evans
Writer's Block: Is It Even a Thing?
- Nathan Shumate
1:30 - 2:20Saying No:
Building Tension Through Dialogue
- Melissa McShane
Webcomic Basics:
What to Know Before You Start
- Aneeka Ricthen
From Sketch to Masterpiece
- Dennis Dorrity
Bringing Your Story To Life
- Aaron Blaylock
Write Killer Prose that Keeps Them Turning Pages and Wanting More
- Craig Nybo
Martial Arts
- Joshua Ramsey
Don't Panic! Dealing with Edits
- Jana S. Brown
2:30 - 3:20#NoFilter:
Change Your Filter and Free Your Writing
- Ali Cross
Outlining for Teens
- Dan Willis
Tonal Thumbnailing
- Dustin Foran
The Writer's Life For Beginners
Scott Tarbet
Giving a Ghost a Purpose
- Eliza Crosby
Psychology in Story Writing
- Craig Ramsey
Hollywood Formula:
Adapting a Screenwriting Technique to Novels
- Gama Ray Martinez

How to Get A Literary Agent to Swipe Right
- Terri Baranowski
3:30 - 4:20Plot Bunnies:
Picking an Idea
- Julie Frost
How to Write Cover Copy/Queries in 10 Easy(ish) Steps
- Amber Argyle
DIY Religious Cults
- Jaleta Clegg
4:30 - 5:20The Un-Put-Downable Book
- Cindy Hogan
How Chainmail is Made
- Scott Bascom
The Modern Mad Scientist is Alive and Well in Pop Culture and Fiction
- Ryan Decaria
Writing for Young Adults
- Johnny Worthen
HVAC and Space in Space Ships
- Kevin Evans
Self Publishing versus Traditional Publishing:
Epic Throwdown
- Jana S. Brown
5:30 - 7:20SibScript Awards Ceremony
7:30 - 9:20Mix and Mingle

Thursday Panel Schedule

TimesPanel Room 1
Building D2
Room 110
Panel Room 2
Building D2
Room 111
Activity Room (Ballroom B)
11:00amRegistration
12:00pmRegistration
12:30-1:20Monsters that are Not Villains
- Julie Frost (M), Larry Correia, Rebekah Ganiere, Toni Weisskopf, and Wendy Knight.
Selling Your Art:
Online Platforms and Other Outlets
- Bobbie Berendson W (M), Carter Reid, Dennis Dorrity, Janix Moon
1:30-2:20Stargate:
When Human's Aren't the Top of the Food Chain
- Jaleta Clegg (M), James Ganiere, Jason King, Newton Ewell, and Robert J Defendi
Behind the Canvas:
Q&A Heather Theurer
2:30-3:20
Baen Road Show
- Toni Weisskopf
3:30 -4:20Is Illustration Fine Art
- Amberly Berendson, Bobbie Berendson W, Dennis Dorrity, Devon Dorrity (M), and Sean Ricks
4:30-5:20Cat Saving for Fun and Profit:
Various Story Structures
- Ali Cross, C Michelle Jefferies (M), John M Olsen, M.K. Hutchins, Robert J Defendi
How to Break Into Doing Book Covers
- Carter Reid (M), Devon Dorrity, and Sean Ricks
5:30-7:30

Friday Schedule

TimeBuilding D3
Room 203
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 204
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 205
Art
Building D3
Room 206
Teen
Building D3
Room 207
Teen
Building D3
Room 233
Building D3
Room 302
Building D3
Room 304
Building D3
Room 306
Building D3
Room 307
Building D3
Room 336
Building D3
Room 337
Building D3
Room 339
9:00Registration (Lobby)
9:30
-
10:20
Vivid Description
- M.K. Hutchins
No More Damsels in Distress
- Wendy Knight
Visual Library:
Importance and Function
- Dustin Foran
Writing Through Life
- Jill Bowers
A Day in the Life FBI Agent
- Mark Roberts
Introduction to Sculpture
- Devon Dorrity
Creative Juice Bar:
A Writing Prompt Workshop
- Terri Baranowski
Plot Dragons: Revealing Your Core Plot
- Melissa McShane
Pick a Card, Any Card:
Index Card Plotting and Structure
- C. Michelle Jeffries
Movie Sets: Breaking the Mold
- James Ganiere
10:30
-
11:20
Story Structure Workshop
- Alyson Peterson
Breaking Through Writer's Block
- Lisa Mangum
Basic Elements of Visual Design
- Jaleta Clegg
What Angles Say:
Using Camera Angles to Tell a Story
- Aneeka Richins
Swords and Spears and Axes! Oh My!
Medieval Weapons 101
- C. David Belt
Podcasting 101
- Bryce Beattie
Names for Your Characters
- Karen Evans
The Process of Weaving
- Judie Eatough
11:30
-
12:20
Going to the Next Level
- James Ganiere
Your Journey Into Becoming a Professional Artist
- Heather Theurer
Writing Romance for Teens
- Rebekah R. Ganiere
Making Dragon Eggs
- Janix Moon
There's an Alien on my Desk
SF&F
- Julie Barnson
Ever Wanted to Make Your Own Stuffed Animals?
- Hannah Swedin
Plot Werewolves:
Plotting Perfect Through Parallelism
Kevin L. Nielsen
Magical Systems
- Amber Argyle
The Awesomeness of Chocolate
- Karen Evans
12:30
-
1:20
Building Better Characters:
The Mr. Potato Head Way
- Lisa Mangum
Who am I?
Creating your Professional Author Bio(s)
- Jana S. Brown
Plotting a Novel in an Hour
- Robert J. Defendi and Dan Willis
Training Alpha Readers and Beta Readers
- Callie Stoker
Fan Fiction as a Learning Tool (Part 1)
- Julie Frost and Patrick Tracy
Finding an Agent
- Ayson Peterson
It’s who You Know!
Networking Strategy and Etiquette for Authors
- Jason King
Atmospheric Chemistry: Taming the Dinosaurs and Their Pasture
- Delbert Eatough
1:30
-
2:20
Painting Emotion and Imagery with Word
- Candace Thomas
Flash Fiction
- Jenna Eatough
Designing A Digital Comic for the Web
(Story-Driven Webcomics)
- Aneeka Richins
Choose Your Own Adventure:
Which Path to Publishing Is Right For You?
- Caryn Larrinaga
Wearable Art
- Amberly Berendson and Bobbie Berendson W
Magic Beyond Systems:
The Real World Magic Model
- Dave Butler
Coloring Workshop
- Newton Ewell
Escaping Fanfic #&@!! (Part 2)
- Patrick Tracy and Julie Frost
Rumplestiltskin's Paradox:
When Actions Speak Louder Than Words
- Jana S. Brown
Mermaid
- Erin Spencer
2:30
-
3:30
Diving into Deep Point of View
- Rebecca Blevins
Beginning Scrivener for Teens
- Rebekah R. Ganiere
How to Make a Comic Book
- Charles Moisant
TNT
- Scott "Rev" Hurst
Designing a Cover for Your Genre
Or Why Can't I Use Hot Pink Lipstick Fonts on My Deep Space Hard SF Novel?
- Jaleta Clegg
Business Formation for Writing
- Mike Glassford
Breaking News:
Flipping Your Story Upside Down Brings Clarity
- Aaron Blaylock
Cars, Bars, and Starships:
Writing Inanimate Objects as Character
- Ryan Decaria
From Looms to Computers
- Judie Eatough
3:30
-
4:20
Look to the Stars:
Creating an Astrology Mythos
- Melissa McShane
Heroes That Wheeze
- Scott William Taylor
Harry Potter as an Acceptable Mary Sue
- Caryn Larrinaga, Dustin Steinacker (M), Michelle Witte
So You Want to Make a Coloring Book
- Bobbie Berendson W
How Horror Isn't Suspense
- Nathan Shumate and Craig Nybo
Paint as You Go
- Heather Theurer
The Editor Is In:
A Live Editing Demonstration
- Lisa Mangum
First Round Edits
- Holli Anderson and Jason King
Medieval Weapons
- John Fitzen
4:30
-
5:20
Comic Books as Literature
- Christopher Husberg
Creative Juice Bar:
A Writing Prompt Worksho
- Terri Baranowski
Digital Painting Technology Programs
- Jemma Young
The Audiobook Code
- Craig Nybo
It's All About the Dialogue
- Rebecca Blevins
What Do Writing Groups Have to Offer?
- Chris Roche
Writer as Entrepreneur:
Getting beyond the Idea of "Writing as a Job"
- Dave Butler
Psychology of Ted Bundy
- Al Carlisle
5:30
-
6:20
Creating Another Wizard That Isn't Another Gandalf, Dumbledoor, ect.
- Scott William Taylor
Characters
-Karen E. Hoover
Finding the Fear in Monster Creation
- Devon Dorrity
Making Flight from Showdow Fan Film
- Hraefn Wulfson
Writing to Theme
- Johnny Worthen
Draw With Philo
- Philo Barnhart
Writing Pulp Fiction for Fun and Profit
- Jay Barnson and David J. West
A Character Walked Into a Bar:
Creating Plots for Characters That Just Waltzed Into Your Subconscious
- Jaleta Clegg
Steampunk Tropes & Tips
- Scott Tarbet
How to Write Dark Without Compromising Your Own Character
- Ali Cross
Armor
- Joshua Todd
6:30
-
7:20
2D Design Layout
-Rob Carlos
Breathing Life Into Your Characters with Color
- Dennis Dorrity
Latter-Day Saint Vampires in Utah?
- C David Belt
Writing Flash Fiction
- Patrick Tracy
Narrate Drive
- M.K. Hutchins

Friday Panel Schedule

TimesPanel Room 1
Building D2
Room 110
Panel Room 2
Building D2
Room 111
Panel Room 3
Building D2
Room 301
Activity Room (Ballroom B)
9:00amRegistration
9:30-10:20amUsing History to Make your Alternate Universe
- Craig Nybo (M), David J. West, Eric Swedin, and Larry Correia
Writing in Someone Else's Universe
- Dan Willis, David Farland, and Kevin L. Nielsen (M)
Conventions: How to Make them Valuable for You
Heather Theurer, Kevin Evans, and Rebecca Blevins (M)
10:30-11:20Realistic Gun Fights in Fiction
- Larry Correia
Phillip K Dick:
Why His Stories Are Still Being Made
- Callie Stoker, David Farland, Hraefn Wulfson, and Kevin Evans (M)
Stop Stealing My Art: Dealing with Copyright Infringement
Charles D. Moisant, Dennis Dorrity, and Robin Ambrose (M)
11:30-12:20Resurrection: Is the Cleric on Retainer? The Cost of Resurrecting Characters
- Dan Willis, Jaleta Clegg, and Jana S. Brown (M)
David Farland Q&A
- David Farland
Books that Influenced the Authors
Aaron Blaylock, Callie Stoker (M), Dave Butler, Johnny Worthen, and Wendy Knight
12:30-1:20The Internet, Information Overlord: Has it Ruined Storytelling?
- Anastasia Bolinder, Karen E. Hoover, Melissa McShane, Michelle Witte, and Terri Baranowski (M)
Frazetta:
Painting with Fire
Documentary Followed by Discussion
- David J. West, Devon Dorrity, and Hraefn Wulfson (M)
1:30-2:20Fantasy: More than Magic and Elves
- Alyson Peterson (M), Holli Anderson, M.K. Hutchins, and Wendy Knight
Adapting Timeless Stories
- Anastasia Bolinder, Gama Ray Martinez, Janix Moon, John M Olsen (M), and Rebecca Blevins
2:30-3:20
How Disney Influenced Your Art
- Amberly Berendson, Heather Theurer (M), and Philo Barnhart
The Future of Steam Punk and Cyber Punk
Dan Willis, Dave Butler (M), Jay Barnson, John M Olsen, and Scott Tarbet
3:30 -4:20My History as an Animator
- Philo Barnhart
How to Manipulate Your Audience:
Don't (But Do it Anyway)
- Aaron Blaylock, Ben Ireland (M), C Michelle Jefferies, Candace J Thomas (M), and Eliza Crosby
CGI on TV: Babylon 5 and Beyond
Hraefn Wulfson, Jenna Eatough, Newton Ewell, Robert J Defendi, and Scott Bascom (M)
4:30-5:20Computer in My Pocket:
Where Will it be Tomorrow
- Caryn Larrinaga, Eric Swedin (M), Joseph Jones, and Robert J Defendi
The Types of Zombies
Carter Reid (M), Charles D. Moisant, Devon Dorrity, and Rob Carlos
5:30-6:20Art vs Photo Composition for Covers: Which is Better
- Amber Argyle (M), Charles D. Moisant, Dennis Dorrity, Rob Carlos, and Sean Ricks
How to Research what Publishers are Looking For
- Jason King (M), Lisa Mangum, and Toni Weisskopf
Writing Action Scenes
- Larry Correia
6:30-7:20Killer Elevator
Exploring Jupiter Ascending and Other Big Picture Disasters
James Ganiere, Dustin Steinacker, Jaleta Clegg (M), Joseph Jones, and Robert J Defendi
7:30-8:20

Saturday Schedule

TimeBuilding D3
Room 203
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 204
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 205
Art
Building D3
Room 206
Building D3
Room 207
Art
Building D3
Room 233
Building D3
Room 302
Building D3
Room 304
Building D3
Room 306
Building D3
Room 307
Building D3
Room 336
Building D3
Room 337
Building D3
Room 339
9:00Registration (Lobby)
9:30
-
10:20
Roller Coaster Writing
- Frank Cole
Fear as a Story Telling Tool
- Ben Ireland
Making Art on a Budget
- Bobbie Berendson W
The Evolution of Science Fiction
- Eric G. Swedin (M), Jaleta Clegg, Newton Ewell
Get Started with Digital Painting
- Dennis Dorrity
How to Stuff your Dragon:
Intro into Making Unique Stuffed Animals Using 3D Software
- Hannah Swedin
Fixing the Romance in Your Book
- Rebekah R. Ganiere
Strong First Pages
- Rebecca Blevins
Costume Research and Practice for Fiction Writers
- Jen McGrew
Creating and Promoting Your Brand
- Jason King
The Mind of a Serial Killer
- Al Carlisle
10:30
-
11:20
Hook, Line, and Sinker
- Holli Anderson and Jason King
Combat Writing
- Alyson Peterson
Created Languages
- D.G. Fletcher
Warping Reality as Percieved
- Dustin Foran
Papa Hemingway On Writing:
Ernest Hemingway
- Scott Tarbet
Calligraphy
- John M Olsen
What I Wish I’d Known Before Publishing
- Kevin L. Nielsen
Writing Serials for Fun and Profit
- David J West
Cryptology and the Future of Computers
- Eric Swedin
11:30
-
12:20
Dragon Slaying and Other Extreme Sports
- Jill Bowers
The Effects of Japanese Anime on Western Art
- Charles D. Moisant, Philo Barnhart
Digital Comic Book Coloring
- Jemma Young
Author Websites 101
- Bryce Beattie
Resin Casting
- Carter Reid
Sharpen the Hook
- Robert J. Defendi and Dan Willis
Understanding Story Archetypes
- Christopher Husberg
Finding Your Voice
-Angie Lofthouse
More Than a Pretty Face:
Defining Strength
- Jaleta Clegg
Ghost Hunting
- Lydia Lyman and Kris Langman
12:30
-
1:20
Language Barriers
- Aneeka Richins
Up From the Well:
Rune Fundamentals
- Hraefn Wulfson
Marketing:
Gain Boatloads of Fans with Modern Marketing Strategies that Really Work
- Craig Nybo
Harnessing Deep POV
- Callie Stoker
Adventures Under the Earth
- Swede Larson
1:30
-
2:20
To Infinity and Beyond!
Make Disney Pixar Storytelling Elements
- Rebecca Blevins
Do Spaceships Sing?
- Kevin Evans
Fantastic Creature Ideas and Structures
- Rob Carlos
Storytelling Festival
Are You Hungry?
Food in Writing
- C. Michelle Jefferies
Inking your Artwork
- Newton Ewell
Character Creation And Managemant, The D&D Way
- Johnny Worthen
Flashbacks:
Learn How to Make Them Work for You
- Amber Argyle
Swords and Spears and Axes! Oh My!
(Medieval Weapons 101)
- C. David Belt
2:30
-
3:30
Beginning Scrivener for Teens
- Rebekah R. Ganiere
Neville to the Rescue:
Creating Powerful Side Characters
- Caryn Larrinaga
GMC:
Goal, Motivation, and Conflict
- Karen E. Hoover
Drawing Portraits in Charcoal
- Dennis Dorrity
Outlining
- Dan Willis
3:30
-
4:20
Give Your Bad Guys a Heart
- Wendy Knight
Prewriting
- Karen Hoover
A History of Jewelry
- Scott Bascom
Indie Book Cover Design:
How To Be Your Own Creative Director
- Nathan Shumate
Creating an Author/Agent Match Made in Heaven
- Terri Baranowski
There are No Rules, Here are Ten
- Johnny Worthen
Combat PTSD
- Al Carlisle
4:30
-
5:20
Voice Victorious:
Learn to Understand Voice & Define Your Own
- Ali Cross
Backgrounds and Landscapes
- Sean Rick
Character Archetypes
-Dan Willis
Using Ancient Cultures in Your Artwork
- Jemma Young
Four-Thread Film Narrative and Production Design
- Hraefn Wulfson
Embrace the TROPE!
- Jason King
There Oughta be a Law...
- Robin Ambrose
5:30
-
6:20
Writing is a Business?
- Mike Glassford
Dare to Write Poetry
- Patrick Tracy
Comic Books Art:
Setting the Mood
- Charles D. Moisant
Podcast: Plain Donuts
Storytelling through Board Games:
Adding Story Resonance to Game Play
- Ryan Decaria
Using Symbolism in Fiction
- Angie Lofthouse
The Short Story Submission Machine
- John M Olsen and Julie Frost
Who am I?
Creating your Professional Author Bios
- Jana S. Brown
Tech of Steampunk
- Kevin Evans
6:30
-
7:20
Are Critique Groups Worth It?
- Scott Taylor
Layering:
Accomplishing More Story with Less Words
- Callie Stoker
Drawing Dynamic Characters
- Dennis Dorrity
It's All About the Dialogue
- Rebecca Blevins
The End of Storys
- Cindy Hogan
Picture Book Writing
- Christy Dorrity
Creating with Economy
- Hraefn Wulfson
The Awesomeness of Chocolate
- Karen Evans

Saturday Panel Schedule

TimesPanel Room 1
Building D2
Room 110
Panel Room 2
Building D2
Room 111
Panel Room 3
Building D2
Room 301
Activity Room (Ballroom B)
9:00amRegistration
9:30-10:20amPoetry and Music in Your Book
- C.H. Lindsay, Candace J Thomas, Jill Bowers (M), and Karen E. Hoover,
Weber Lecture Classes. Please Do Not Disturb.Using Art Styles to Enhance Storytelling
- Amberly Berendson, Heather Theurer, Jemma Young (M), and Philo Barnhart
10:30-11:20Why Writing and Art Contests are Important
- David Farland, Dustin Steinacker, Jay Barnson, Jenna Eatough, and Julie Frost (M)
Using Easter Eggs in Your Art
- Bobbie Berendson W (M), Heather Theurer, Jemma Young, Philo Barnhart, and Rob Carlos
11:30-12:20Adapting Books into Movies: What Should Be Lost
- David Farland, Dustin Steinacker, and James Ganiere (M)
Submitting to Art Shows and Conventions: What You Should Know
- Bobbie Berendson W (M), Hannah Swedin, and Rob Carlos
12:30-1:20Creating New Boxes for Characters by Avoiding Boxes
- Jana S. Brown, Jason King (M), Kevin L. Nielsen, and Michelle Witte
Underused Conflicts: What are They and How They Make Your Story Stronger
- C Michelle Jefferies, Gama Ray Martinez, Johnny Worthen, and M.K. Hutchins (M)
1:30-2:20Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Breaking the Tropes with Style
- Ali Cross, Christopher Husberg (M), Jill Bowers, and Robert J Defendi
Lines and Limitations of Making 3D Art
- Charles D. Moisant, Devon Dorrity (M), Hannah Swedin, and Hraefn Wulfson
Can Rebellion Lead to Anything but Rebellion
- Caryn Larrinaga, Jana S. Brown (M), Kevin L. Nielsen, Michelle, Witte and Nathan Shumate
2:30-3:20
Genre Crossing: How Not to Break Your World
- Ali Cross, Alyson Peterson, Gama Ray Martinez, Jaleta Clegg, and Julie Frost (M)
The Best Ways to Reproduce Your Art: Tips, Tricks, and Warnings
- Charles D. Moisant, Hannah Swedin, Jemma Young (M), and Sean Ricks
3:30 -4:20Toni Q&A
- Toni Weisskopf and Larry Correia
Writers and Artists Collaboration
- Bryce Beattie (M), Caryn Larrinaga, and Newton Ewell
4:30-5:20
5:30-6:20Is the Ultimate Evil Dead?: What are We Losing by Justifying Bad Actions
- Alyson Peterson, Christopher Husberg, and Kevin L. Nielsen (M)
Reboots vs Revivals in Movies and TV Series
- Aaron Blaylock (M), Caryn Larrinaga, Dustin Steinacker, James Ganiere, Jason King, and Nathan Shumate
Character Creation is not Mitosis: Giving Them Their Own Values and Voice
- C Michelle Jefferies, Craig Nybo, Jaleta Clegg (M), and Rebecca Blevins
6:30-7:20Writing Humor
- Aaron Blaylock, Alyson Peterson (M), Johnny Worthen, and Robert J Defendi
The Role of Dragons in Stories
- Janix Moon (M), Jill Bowers, Kevin L. Nielsen, and Rebekah R. Ganiere
How to Read a Book in Order to Illustrate It
- Anastasia Bolinder, Rob Carlos (M), and Toni Weisskopf

So you've finished that manuscript, but where do you go from here? Self publish? Traditional? Hybrid? What's the difference? How do you know which one is for you? What about small publishers? Come and learn the answers to these questions and more and conquer your writing career.



Young Adult literature has never been more popular. What are the elements and pitfalls of writing for this audience? From gatekeepers to content, genre wish-fulfillment to teaching moments, what are the considerations and challenges of writing Young Adult?

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Content, length and style
b) Gatekeepers
c) Complexities of theme
d) Genre archetypes

The mad-scientist trope has endured well from its infancy with Doctors Frankenstein, Rotwang, and Moreau. We'll explore the modern mad scientist, and her megalomania, curiosity, and obsession. We'll discuss the plucky Jillian Holtzman (Ghostbusters), the ambitious Holden Radcliffe (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.), the tormented Walter Bishop (Fringe), and many others both virtuous and villainous. What makes these characters so compelling? And how has the mad-scientist trope evolved in the last 200 years?

A presentation on the history and structure of chainmail from around the world, with a section on how to do it yourself.

The Un-Put-Downable Book: crafting scenes that make it impossible for your readers to put down your book until the very end

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Where to start your book
b) Cause and effect
c) Goal-Conflict-failure
d) Revision with maximum results
e) How to end your book

How can you use a religious cult in your stories as more than just bad guys? First, you have to understand what cults are and what needs they fill for their members. Once you've got that figured out, then comes the fun part - creating your own cult.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Defining cults - what makes it a cult? Are there different types of cults?
b) What needs do they fill? A basic primer on psychological needs of humans
c) Examples in fiction and reality
d) Time to offend someone! Creating your own religious cult

How do you write cover copy or book descriptions that sell your book? We'll go over the goals of your cover copy as well as a step by step formula to creating evocative descriptions that sell books to readers and agents alike.

Poimts the Class Will Cover:
a) Defining the goal of the cover copy
b) Nailing down our audience and tone/voice
c) Steps to creating cover copy with examples
Class Activity: The class will work on writing our own cover copy during the second hour.


In this fun class, Lit Agent Terri Baranowski compares finding an agent to online dating. Learn how to set yourself apart and avoid the pitfalls that lead to rejection. You just need the right broom." Come with a broken heart, leave with the confidence of Casanova!

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) How to select and prepare to submit to an agent.
b) Pitfalls to avoid.
c) How to set yourself apart.

An examination of a couple of movies (Dark Knight, The Avengers) and how and where they are divided into three acts, as well as the smaller divisions. The second hour will involve creating an outline from scratch.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Three major roles in a story
b) Focusing on a single character
c) Multiple characters and interwoven plotlines
Class Activity: Analysis of movies. Creation of an outline.

Understanding normal and abnormal psychology in the development of your characters both hero’s and villains.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Psychological overview – a guide to mental health issues and the field of clinical psychology
b) Understanding how character and mental health issues can impact human behavior, thoughts and experience
c) How to identify and explore any mental health issues your characters may have
d) How to use psychological assessment and formulation techniques to build full, believable characters
e) Q&A and group discussion

Ghosts can be an important part of your story, if you use them right. Come learn how to make your ghost seem alive.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Discussing the past life of a ghost, and why they are haunting where they are
b) (class exercise) Creating a good ghost vs. evil ghost and the reason why they were left behind
c) Discussing reasons a ghost doesn’t move on from this world, or is this the ghost world and we don’t belong?
d) Making the ghost relevant in your story, and weaving their purpose into the book

So you write stories, and you want to make it a way of life. What can you expect? What are the joys, the sorrows, the challenges, the payoffs? What will you sacrifice, and what will you gain? How has the writer’s life changed over the years, and what can you expect in the future?.

The importance of tone and thumbnail concept development. Live digital demo.


We each go through life with a filter--negative thoughts we tell ourselves--that effects everything we do. As writers, the filters we use can adversely impact our writing and our career. In this class we'll learn to identify the negative filters we regularly use, and how to replace them with the ones that will let the beauty of our stories shine through, freeing us to find the success we deserve.

Ah, the dreaded Edits. The red-soaked remains of your precious manuscript, returned to you from the heartless realms of Editoriam. In this class we will talk about the kinds of edits you can expect to get in various stages. How to weigh an edit and what to do when you feel like the editor is...wrong.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Preparing a manuscript for Editing
b) Types of edits and when they should occur
c) Weighing editorial suggestion
d) Responding to editorial suggestion
e) What to do when you disagree
f) Maintaining a positive Author/Editor relationship

A master in Karate and great instructor, has traveled to China to study in this amazing craft of martial arts. He will be presenting on his in depth work in Karate, and his skills in the art. He will give demonstrations on the moves he teaches, and why it requires so much discipline. Josh will advise martial arts in literature and how it should be written when writing a fight scene and conflict of Karate.

Your book shares shelf space with Stephen King, J.K. Rowling, Kurt Vonnegut, and Roald Dahl. You can only hope to compete for readers' eyes if your story is engaging and your prose is perfect. Learn specific ways to improve your prose. Learn the art of driving your descriptions and metaphors through character voices.

From inspiration to resolution, how to cultivate your ideas and help your story grow to its full potential. Learn what you’ll need to turn your “someday” into a book.

a) Two (and a half) Approaches – The architect and the gardener.
b) The obstacles – What is standing in your way.
c) The challenge to sacrifice – How to remove it.
d) Essentials to Grow Your Story – What your story needs.
e) Essentials to Grow as an Author – What you need.
f) One Last Thing – The one thing you should know.

Learn how to start a sketch while keeping everything in mind (lighting, color, contrast, etc) and pickup tips to grow your sketch into a masterpiece.



Good dialogue is more than just two people talking. This class will address the question of what makes dialogue interesting and how it can be used to forward a story. The class will participate in writing dialogues using the techniques discussed.



Karen and Kevin Evans have been researching and writing both Fiction and Non-fiction for over 20 years. In this workshop they will walk you though researching topics you always wanted to write about and how to be expert enough to fool your readers.

Myron Burnet will take us to the future that is now, within our own homes. He will talk about the future of taking our homes more high tech with computerized options.

Got a case of the freak outs? Not to worry. Alyson Peterson's "Author With Anxiety" class will enlighten you on the in's and the out's of being the public face of your book. We will discuss what it takes to be real with your audience, how to open up, and fight your inner demons so that you can get out there and spread the news on your novels.

How writing team fiction differs from traditional plotting and character arc. How to play the tropes and write to make your reader happy.

Points the Class will Cover:
a) What is it?
b) How is it different from traditional plotting.
c) How to play the tropes right.

Nearly everyone who has a computer has some access to digital art tools. Amberly has spent a decade playing with them in traditional art ways and making digital work that stands out. Covering topics such as basic free-pay digital art tools, using brush tools like traditional artists, building digital color on your pencil sketches (your scanner is your friend), printing effects of different papers on digital art.

Come learn the different kids of short fiction, what makes short fiction work, where to find critique partners, and how to sell it in today's market.

Points the class will cover:
a) What short fiction is
b) Why writers write short fiction
c) Tips and tricks for writing short
d) How to decide if your idea suited to a short story or a novel
e) Why critiquing is valuable
f) How to research markets, submit to them, and track your submissions

Learn how to write vivid description that enhances your characters and your plot. Bring a laptop or paper and pencil - we're going to practice!

Can't finish anything? Do you always get lost in the middle of your story? A flash fiction story can be finished in one or two sessions, and helps you hone your style, providing you with lessons you can take into your longer works. Maybe you've always written novels, but you need to work on brevity and compression. Flash fiction is great for that. Whether you're working on your first or hundredth story, there's something that the crucible of a tiny story can teach you.

Beginner to Intermediate level class.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Flash fiction defined. What it is, how it works.
b) All the features, but smaller.
c) A window into how it's done: helpful notes for how to plan a flash story.
d) The wonderful virtue of practice: How finishing things makes you a better, happier writer.
e) Free writing time: time permitting, interested class memebers can try to plan out a flash story, or even write one.
f) Write well, write short, write often. (Positive Affirmation).

Incorporating Mythology and the Supernatural into Modern LDS Literature — An exploration of mythology and the supernatural in the context of LDS theology. Writing fantasy and horror for an LDS audience can be a daunting task. How can you introduce vampires or giants or Norse gods or fairies or magic into your story and remain 100% consistent with the scriptures and LDS doctrine? Includes a case-study of “The Children of Lilith,” an LDS vampire trilogy set in modern-day Utah.

Learn the importance that color brings to your images. Discover new color palettes and find out why they work in this course. Also uncover the colors that will help to define your character and what makes them so unique.



The two friends and co-presenters are bringing their specialties all the way to us! They are taking a short break from filming movies just to come and teach us about armor and how it should be used and written about, and they will discuss the evolution of metal. How these things got started from the earliest of knowledge to now the present day. They will also demonstrate how to use some of their items and know how.

Not all stories are sunshine and rainbows. But how do you keep your sanity, a cheerful attitude, or a positive outlook when the stories you're compelled to write deal the with darker, more troubling side of life? We'll discuss the value of dark stories and techniques to keep your own heart and soul free of their cloying appeal.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is a dark story?
b) What is the value of dark stories?
c) How immersing yourself in your writing can affect you.
d) Techniques to keep yourself free from the effects of your story.
This is a highly interactive class with a lot of laughter and silliness. Note: We will openly discuss subjects and language that might be offensive to some.



So this character just popped into my head one day and demanded I write her story. Trouble is, I don't know her story. So how do I go about figuring it out? Tips and techniques to generate a plot for those wonderful people who live inside every writer's head.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Defining the character - you have to know who they are before you can tell their story. What matters to them? What bothers them? What are they passionate about?
b) Finding a starting point - identifying the trigger point
c) Questions to ask to keep the story rolling

Pulp fiction writers grew and defined modern "genre fiction." They made careers by being both prolific and discovering the secrets of spinning tales the editors and the public wanted to buy. Come learn their tricks and tips, and how successful authors are still using them in today's market.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) History - What was pulp?
b) How it applies today. How does it matter?
c) Writing Pulp - The Lester Dent Master Plot Formula
d) Writing the Pulp Novel
e) How to Sell Pulp Fiction?

Learn how to draw The Little Mermaid and more.

Raise your work to literary levels by consciously incorporating themes. Learn how to identify what you’re trying to say and actively nurture the subtler but greater questions you’re addressing. Enhance your writing with symbols as signposts, layers of grays and depths of meaning. Give the literary critics something to enjoy,

Class will also consider the therapeutic qualities of writing and ask the author to consciously incorporate ideas of theme into their work, exploring the human condition through parallel plots, symbols, conflict, and alternative points of view to address lingering questions and personal issues.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Writing intention and therapy
b) The parts united by s single thread
c) Subtexts
d) Symbolism







An in-depth discussion of the wonderful world of wizards, what they are/aren't, should/shouldn't be, and just how far can you go with the character.



Your writing is a business, whether you like it or not. Come learn five fundamental business ideas that can help you make your writing business a success, over the long term and even as the details of the business constantly change around you.

An in depth look at the different aspects of writing groups. Companionship, support, critiques, training, and much more.

Are you worried that your characters sound wooden (and none of them are Pinocchio)? In this class, we’ll discuss how to make your characters sound realistic. After all, they have to learn to talk to each other instead of just to you.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) How to make dialogue flow naturally
b) How to break up dialogue with actions and setting
c) How to write internal dialogue and weave it with spoken dialogue
d) How to address accents
e) How to punctuate dialogue
Class Activity: We'll take a straightforward, short piece of dialogue, and each participant will use what they learn to flesh it out into a short scene

Cracking the audiobook code can lead to a whole new base of fans. Learn how to record your books like a pro with DIY recording techniques. Learn recording software tutorials and mastering techniques that will ensure that your book will be accepted by Audible.com



Whether you want to know where to get ideas or have a chance to write flash fiction, come to this workshop hosted by Literary Agent Terri Baranowski and be prepared to be inspired!

Comics, even today, too often carry with them connotations of immaturity, laziness, and low-brow writing. That could not be further from the truth! In this class we'll discuss why comics are important and powerful. We'll look at a few specific examples of fantastic comics and see what we can learn from them.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Comics as Literature
b) Maus and Watchmen
c) What can we learn?

John will demonstrate how medieval weapons are made. He travels around from television shows, and festivals of all kinds to sell his home made weaponry. He will teach us many ways of using these weapons, and how they were used once upon a time. He will show his special skill with these weapons and help us understand how they should be used in story.

This class will include step-by-step instructions of the first round of edits the author will do after completion of a rough draft, including search and replace, passive vs. active, show not tell, grammar, punctuation, and more.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Fonts and Characters—First Things First
b) Checking for Common Mistakes—Getting Down and Dirty
c) Revamping Punctuation—Commas, Ellipses, and Colons- Oh, my!
d) Dialogue Tags—Saying Things the Write Way
e) Numbers—A,B,C or 1,2,3?
f) Miscellaneous Stuff—More Things to Fix
Class Activity: Examples of passive writing and passive words will be thrown out--the class will rewrite the examples to show active writing.
Examples of telling instead of showing will be given--the class will rewrite the examples to show the action instead of telling.

Ever wonder what goes on in an editor's mind when faced with a new manuscript? Shadow Mountain Managing Editor, Lisa Mangum, will live edit several pages of an unpublished manuscript and talk through the kinds of things she changes (or doesn't change) and why.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Editing rule #1: First, do no harm.
b) There are lots of "right" ways to edit a manuscript.
c) Editing is a creative exercise, just like writing is.

Heather Theurer will bring a piece to work on and cover some of the basics of how she moves through its creation. Students are encouraged to bring their own art to work on during the class. Encouragement and critiques will be given as they progress through it. Open to inquires, so come with questions!

A Discussion Of What's Really Scary, and What's a Horror Story

Coloring is the relaxation rage these days, how do you turn your doodles into a coloring book and get it on the market for people to buy. The foundation of a quality coloring book, online resources for free publishing and distribution, advertizing and funding your coloring book (Kickstarter & Misc.), special content that makes you stand out.

Heroes mean different things in different eras. What possibly is the most interesting aspect of any hero is their weakness. In this class we'll discuss what makes a hero and what can bring them down.

Astrology is as old as mankind and is endlessly fascinating. Learn how to mine the elements of astrology to create a mythos that can be the basis for your own fantasy world.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) A brief overview of astrology, including some non-Western concepts.
b) How to identify key ideas that will work together to build a mythos.
c) Adding the details to make it unique.
Class Activity: The class will work together to build a mythos from astrological ideas.

Have the opportunity to see and try the looms and the process of producing textiles for warmth and clothing. These methods have existed for thousands of years, only the power source has changed through time.

Point the Class Will Cover
a) Time and resources required to provide textiles for a community.
b) Proverbs 31:18-24. Business of textile production.
c) Penelope and weaving. How long does it take.
d) The technology available determines the clothing you can wear.

Sometimes an inanimate object takes on a life of its own. Cars can become more than transportation, evolving into a friendly sidekick or a villainous foe. Spaceships come alive with a voice and personality. Some ships are actually presented as living beings. And the corner bar where everyone knows your name develops an energy that transcends the furniture. Learn how to apply these dynamic and existential qualities to the inanimate characters in your fiction?

Nearly a decade as a freelance sports writer taught author Aaron Blaylock how to build a news story. He applied the principles he learned to plot his novels from back to front. Learn how to construct your story using a newspaper perspective to shape your plotting.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Headline
b) Who, What, When, Where
c) Climax
d) Points of interest
e) What’s next?

You finished your book and you are ready to sell it! What do you do now? What steps have you taken to start and run your business? Let's make business fun again.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Business Formation
b) Business Operation
c) Contracts

If you pick a book with a buxom maiden falling out of a lacy ballgown with sailing ships in the background, you'd expect it to be historical romance, possibly with pirates, not a cyberpunk thriller. Learn how different typefaces, color schemes, etc align with various genres.



Have a story idea you are considering translating into a comic book? Learn how to decide what type of choices will help set the mood of your story. Charles Moisant will cover the basics how to create a cohesive style in your book.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Deciding if a story is worth telling visually. Not all stories translate well to a visual medium.
b) Deciding which layout to use.
c) Coloring for mood. Creepy, romantic, or comical. The colors make a difference. Will talk about how to pick colors that match your story.
d) Lettering. Layout and type to match your story.

Come and learn why Scriveneris the most versatile writing program out there. Come learn how to use Scrivener. How to use a template. How to add chapters and sections. How to add notes, photos and more.

How do you hook a reader? The answer lies in how to effectively use a deep point of view. We'll discuss varying levels of shallow to medium to deep POV and apply them in a short workshop. Get ready for some hands-on fun!

Points the Class Will Cover
a) What deep point of view is
b) What elements make up a deep point-of-view scene
c) How to choose the number of elements to use to give the reader the experience you wish them to have
d) Which elements are the most effective and which should be used sparingly
e) How to write a scene using those elements
Class Activity: After learning about techniques from my Point-of-View Toolbox, attendees use those tools to help them craft a scene using a scenario we come up with in class.

A real live Ariel! Erin is a Mermaid! She will be presenting on her job as a real life mermaid and what it takes to be this enchanting underwater creature.

When heroes lie and villains tell the truth, do actions truly speak louder than words?

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is the Rumplestiltskin Paradox?
b) Examples in literature and film of the paradox
c) Should we forgive a lying hero? Is redemption for lies or misunderstanding easier?
d)What makes a villain?

You want to write a story, but it's a daunting process. Where to start? How to get from idea to conclusion? We will use fan fiction as a way to ease into the process, giving beginning writers confidence to branch out into creating their own worlds and characters.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is Fan Fiction?
b) A word about copyright.
c) You don't have to do it all: starting with a setting and known characters.
d) Tone and Structure: working from a known blueprint.
e) Canon vs. "What if" fiction
f) Filing off the serial numbers: how to adapt a story written as fan fiction.
g) Goals going forward: do you want to write originals, perhaps for publication? (You don't have to, but you can!)
h) Motivational Affirmation to close the show!

Uncover the basics of coloring illustrations. Every color has ability to evoke different emotions or to create a message or sharp response in the viewer. As artists we learn how to use the attributes of color in subliminally send a message Red, for instance, can illustrate both love and anger, while blue can invoke calmness or sorrow.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Choosing the right colors for you’re the mood you want your illustration
b) Why a color's value is so important
c) Building a color palette
d) Coloring techniques
The first part of the class will be lecture and the second half will be practicing coloring and feedback from instructor. Line art sheets will be provided for practice or bring a work in progress.

Learn how to stop treating every fantasy novel you write like a Magic: The Gathering rip-off and create more authentic wizards, priestesses, and shamans, in order to give your fantasy world-building verisimilitude and depth.

Exploring art as a wearable medium. How to get your work on pay for print sites, jewelry options, Pitfalls to avoid, and how to show your items off.

You’ve written a book, and you’re ready to share your story. But with so many ways to get your novel into a reader’s hands, how can you decide which path to take? Explore the pros and cons of self-publishing, small presses, the “Big 5” and everything in between.

Come learn about story-driven webcomics and how to jump into this world of storytelling.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Story Beats on a Page
b) Software to Use
c) Running a Webcomic

Flash fiction may be brief, but there is a lot you can learn from writing it. Come explore the basics of flash fiction and get hands on with tackling this story type.

This workshop with illustrate the use of literary techniques in evolving emotion and feeling in your words. We will focus on abstract concepts, sentence structure, and poetic imagery in creating a captivating connection to any level of reader.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Basic instruction of some literary techniques
b) Using certain literary techniques to focus on sentence structure and voicing
c) Bringing in abstract concepts and poetry to increase the value of the emotions written
d) Capturing how to use emotion

The class will overview the science behind problems associated with the extensive use of biofuels that writers should be aware of.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Impact of fossil fuel use on the global radiative balance (global warming)
b) Impact of fossil fuel use on visibility (blue skies vs red skies and how well you can see them)
c) Impact of fossil fuel use on morbidity and mortality (what where the London fogs all about?)

You need allies if you are to succeed in building an audience for your writing: successful authors and editors already in the know. So how do you get to know these people without being slapped with a restraining order? Jason King shares some of the finer points of networking in order to build your audience and get noticed.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) No author is an island
b) A rising tide lifts all boats
c) Don’t be THAT guy
d) Can’t fake friendship

Come discover the ins, outs, ups and downs of finding and querying the agent that will best fit your literary needs. We will discuss which agents to avoid, what to look for in an agent, how to query, pitch and otherwise be that starling writer an agent will be dying to sign!

You want to write a story, but it's a daunting process. Where to start? How to get from idea to conclusion? We will use fan fiction as a way to ease into the process, giving beginning writers confidence to branch out into creating their own worlds and characters.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is Fan Fiction?
b) A word about copyright.
c) You don't have to do it all: starting with a setting and known characters.
d) Tone and Structure: working from a known blueprint.
e) Canon vs. "What if" fiction
f) Filing off the serial numbers: how to adapt a story written as fan fiction.
g) Goals going forward: do you want to write originals, perhaps for publication? (You don't have to, but you can!)
h) Motivational Affirmation to close the show!

This presentation covers the difference between alpha and beta readers and how to build yourself a reliable team of readers. What skills and qualifications to look for, and how to train those who are willing but underqualified.

Using suggestions from the audience, we will plot an novel during the course of one class. You'll laugh. You'll cry. Bob will burn about 4,000 calories.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Brainstorming
b) Plotting
c) Structure

The dreaded author bio, whispered about in the hallways at cons and fretted over behind locked office doors. Come and learn what an author bio is, which ones you need and how to get started. Bring paper, pen and courage and be ready to write about you!

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Short Author bio - It's an elevator pitch for you!
b) Medium Author bio - Book jacket, con phamphlet, web page - no problem
c) Long Author bio - Roll out those professional credentials and impress
d) Places each type of Bio comes into play
Class Activity: Each attendee will create a first version of a short author bio for themselves. We'll read some of these aloud and get feedback until we run out of time. The hopes is to get them on the right path for creating a file of author bios and information which will serve them through their professional careers.

There are lots of ways to build a 3-dimensional character, and in this class, editor and author Lisa Mangum uses the various pieces of a Mr. Potato Head toy (eyes, ears, mouth, arms, legs, feet) as a way to dig deeper into a character's development and back story.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Character building covers both the outer, physical description as well as the inner motivations.
b) You don't need to know everything about your character before you start writing
c) Knowing your characters goals will help you know how to build a plot around them.
Class Activity: Lisa will bring some Mr. Potato Head toys as visual aids (and for students to play with, as needed).

What is it, How is it made, and why is that important to writing speculative fiction.

If you use magic in your fiction, this class is a must. Does magic Require Rules? Consequences? In this class, we'll talk about soft and hard magical systems, the rules for each, and what stories require which kind of magic. Additionally, we'll talk about tips to bring your magic to life.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) What is hard magic?
b) What is soft magic?
c) Blending hard and soft magic
Class Activity: Discussing different types of speculative fiction, which type of magic each used, and how to integrate magic into their own works.

The plot can be an epic beast at times. New side-plots, additional ideas, and extraneous details threaten to take over the main story more often than not. Adding multidimensionality to the story can quickly see the light of the moon and end up killing off all your beautiful darlings. This class will cover how to avoid that.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Plot Basics – what is central to a plot
b) Chiasmus – What is it and how can it help prune the deadwood and destroy those plot werewolves?
c) Revising for Plot
d) One Page Plot Worksheet

Anyone who's tried to make their own stuffed animals knows sewing is the easy, making the pattern is hard. Learn the quick and easy way to make plush patterns using tape and saran wrap!

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Using masking tape and other common crafting materials to make a base.
b) Using saran wrap and more masking tape to make your pattern from the base.
c) Time to make it flat; where to place your seams and how to use darts.
d) How to put it back together again!

You have always dreamed of doing what none of your other teachers ever did- teach Science Fiction! But with everything required by teachers, Common Core, Standardized Testing, and a lack of time, it’s harder than you thought! Come find ways to work in Science Fiction literature and culture into everyday classroom life. Current educators, future educators, and homeschoolers will find some tricks and tips to help turn students on to Sci Fi!



Writing YA Romance is fun and true to the age, but what are the differences between writing romance for teens and writing romance for adults? Come find out what it takes to write a convincing and realistic romance for the YA genre.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) What is a romance?
b) What are the differences between romance for YA and Romance for Adults?
c) What are the tropes for YA romance?



How to take yourself to the next level.

Looms and textile production helped drive the industrial revolution and became the first computers. Textile production resulted in child labor laws and technological advances in many fields.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Why automation of textile processes is a logical progression that increased technology.
b) Weaving is a binary process and so are computers.
c) Why the textiles we wear and use indicate the technology available.
d) Textiles and the relationship to armor, tires, and more
Etc.

Do you struggle finding good names? Let's share strategies.

This class will cover the basics of podcasting.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Types of podcast / planning a podcast. Solo vs Online Interviews vs Group.
b) Equipment needed
c) Software Needed (& tips on learning it.)
d) Hosting
e) Notes on using music
f) Getting listed on directories
g) Questions

How can you write believable historical fiction or fantasy that includes swordplay if you’ve never wielded an actual sword? Do you know the difference between a long sword and a great sword? A saber and a rapier? How about the difference between a thrusting spear, a throwing spear, and a hewing spear? How heavy is a mace or a war hammer, and how hard is it to swing one? Why is the butt-cap one of the greatest military inventions of all time? Did you know that a flail (think spiked ball on the end of a chain and handle) is actually a farming implement? Why is the idea of a three-foot long bronze sword wielded by an eleven-year-old (e.g., “Riptide” in the “Percy Jackson” series) laughable? How heavy is a suit of chain vs. plate, and how hard is it move, much less fight wearing armor? This is a HANDS-ON demonstration of various types of swords, axes, spears, and other weapons and armor, ranging from the Bronze Age to the 20th Century, from copper to bronze to high-carbon steel. Participants will have the opportunity to handle and heft actual weapons, don armor, and learn how such items were employed.

In visual stories, such as graphic novels, where the camera is positioned can greatly enhance the telling of a story. Come learn how to enhance the mood and story by changing the camera angles in a simple scene of two people on a park bench.

You don't have to design your own cover, but you should know enough about design to spot a good one. Learn some of the terminology and elements of visual design, then put them to the test on real book covers and interior layout.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Basic elements of visual design - white space, balance, color choice, etc
b) Book cover design - how is it different than other things like brochures, postcards, posters, etc?
c) interior layout - what makes it easy for the reader to read?
d) eBook design vs. print book design

Many authors struggle with writer's block--that dreaded feeling of not know where your story is going or how to get there. But there are ways to get through it, and editor and author Lisa Mangum will share 7 tips on how to get past the block and keep your story on track.

Want to know where to write that critical scene? Not sure how to move your plot forward? Do you pants your story too much? In this Story Structure class we will go over pacing, tone, and solid and organic outlines to make your novel work. Breaking down the three part story structure into b-stories, climatic midpoints, and villainous interventions, we will talk about the story solutions to get you from page one to The End.


Whether online or hard copy, index card plotting and structure can save the writer a lot of headaches. Designed to use both as pen on paper or in Scrivener, as a panster or planner, this overview of using cards can appeal to everyone.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) How to use the cards to plot out a story
b) How to use the cards as an afterthought program to assist in revision
c) How to apply both to digital planning and writing programs

So you've got an idea. And another idea. And there's another one. How do you identify what your core plot should be? This class will focus on burning away irrelevant ideas to reveal the core of your story.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Begin by generating *more* plot ideas--the more the better.
b) Explore your ideas to see which ones have potential.
c) Use character and theme to narrow the list.
d) How to stay focused and not be distracted by other plot ideas once you've made your choice
e) What to do if you chose wrong

Whether you want to know where to get ideas or have a chance to write flash fiction, come to this workshop hosted by Literary Agent Terri Baranowski and be prepared to be inspired!

In this two hour class, Devon Dorrity will instruct the class on the types of clay, armature, tools and equipment you’ll need to get started in sculpture. Clay and tools will be provided for participants to get some hands on learning experiences. Basic techniques will be discussed along with the business of Sculpture. No prior experience necessary.



Writing is more than fun; it can save us. The Writing Through Life class teaches how some of the fundamentals of writing can help us deal with problems we face in our day-to-day lives. Learn to "write your own deliverance" (Hamilton) by coming to this class!

Discussion of the Visual Library concept with examples of how it makes a difference
a) Visual Library: what is it?
b) How to use the Visual Library
c) Expanding the Library
Class Activity: Interactive discussion through the use of slides and sketchbooks.

How to write a believable but relatable heroine.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) How to write a believable but relatable heroine
b) Tough doesn't always mean Tomboy
c) Triumph over demons
Class activity: Character development: create a female lead character, get to know her, and give her skills to save herself that she will learn during the course of the story.

Learn how to write vivid description that enhances your characters and your plot. Bring a laptop or paper and pencil -- we're going to practice!

Ever experience that moment when you realize you’re in an elevator with the agent or editor of your dreams and now is your chance to impress them? We haven’t either, but if that moment comes will you be prepared?





What is it, How is it made, and why is that important to writing speculative fiction.







Are you worried that your characters sound wooden (and none of them are Pinocchio)? In this class, we’ll discuss how to make your characters sound realistic. After all, they have to learn to talk to each other instead of just to you.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) How to make dialogue flow naturally
b) How to break up dialogue with actions and setting
c) How to write internal dialogue and weave it with spoken dialogue
d) How to address accents
e) How to punctuate dialogue
Class Activity: We'll take a straightforward, short piece of dialogue, and each participant will use what they learn to flesh it out into a short scene

Do your characters lack the luster required to grab the attention of the viewer? From pose to outfit to the general look and feel, we will show you how to bring your character out of the mundane and grab people's attention.

As an editor, one of the biggest shortcomings I see in writing are words and sentences that only accomplish one element of writing at a time. This presentation will teach how dialogue can reveal character while moving the plot forward, and description can expand setting while foreshadowing. We will talk about how this technique improves pacing and lowers word count, and how to pin-point and fix thisweakness in your writing.

Writing Critique Groups--some swear by them, others swear at them. But are they worth the work and effort it takes to create a successful, sustainable group? In this class we'll discuss what works, and what doesn't. And above all, will it make you a better writer?



The dreaded author bio, whispered about in the hallways at cons and fretted over behind locked doors. Come and learn what an author bio is, which ones you need and how to get started. Bring paper, pen and courage and be ready to write about you!
a) Short Author bio - It's an elevator pitch for you!
b) Medium Author bio - Book jacket, con pamphlet, web page
c) Long Author bio - Roll out those professional credentials and impress
d) Places each type of Bio comes into play



Symbolism is all around us. Using it in your writing can be a powerful way to engage the reader and make your stories more meaningful and memorable.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is symbolism? What are examples of symbolism that surround us everyday?
b) Small scale symbolism in fiction: metaphors, similies, etc.
c) Large scale symbolism in fiction: themes, character development, motifs, allegory, archetypes
d)How to use symbolism in your fiction to enhance the story and make it truly memorable.

Board and card games are a fascinating breeding ground for organic and playful storytelling. Games that use powerful resonance are easier to learn, more enjoyable to play, and transcend the limited shelf-life of the average game. We'll discuss how designers are adding a wealth of story onto simple game components. We'll deconstruct examples from several current trending games. And then we'll practice flexing our design and storytelling muscles by creating cards for a hypothetical game.

Plain Donuts (http://yourplaindonuts.com) is a comedy and pop culture podcast with co-hosts Steve and Alicia. They take listener questions and chat about embarrassing stories, their journey of trying to be mildly famous, and their unfortunate state of being ignored by Lin-Manuel Miranda on Twitter.

One reviewer said that it contains “hilarious rants," "weird stories," and "a fun take on current events.” They’ve also been described as “kind of like Nerdist” and “the Febreeze of podcasts!” If those things are for you, then Plain Donuts is for you!

Have a story idea you are considering translating into a comic book? Charles Moisant will cover the basics how to create a cohesive style in your book.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Deciding if a story is worth telling visually. Not all stories translate well to a visual medium.
b) Deciding which layout to use.
c) Coloring for mood. Creepy, romantic, or comical. Pick colors that match your story.
d) Lettering. Layout and type to match your story.

Poetry can seem daunting. If you want to try it, but feel like there's just too much to learn, too much to worry about, let this class calm your fears. Anyone can write poetry. Poetry can be when you want it to be. There are no answers, just better questions. There are no rules, only ideas.
Beginner to Intermediate level.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is a poem, anyway?
b) Will I be terrible at poetry? I feel self-conscious.
c) Form vs. Free
d) Rhyming and meter
e) The art of bravery: the emotional value of poetry
f) Lessons: the joy of language
g) Questions and free writing time: the class writes a haiku, or some other poem, if haiku is not their thing.

You finished your book and you are ready to sell it! What do you do now? What steps have you taken to start and run your business? Let's make business fun again.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Business Formation
b) Business Operation
c) Contracts

Robin Ambrose draws from her decade of practice in criminal law and family law to review the reasons and methods of arrest, describe the ways the law can mess with your family, and explain how you can create legal loopholes for whichever plot twist you need.

Trying to find that one thing no other author has done before? Well, sorry. It's all been done before. But don't despair. You can still write that next best-seller. How? By embracingtropesand making them your own! Jason King and James Wymore talk about how successful authors take a familiar trope and make it their own.

In this presentation, Hraefn discusses the ways each of four narrative threads tells a film's story and how these ultimately inform production design. His experiences in the entertainment industry have prompted him to break down film narrative theory into four equally important components: Practical, cinematic, aesthetic and auditive. His eye-opening perspective may change the way you watch movies from now on.







With hands-on exercises, learn to identify point-of-view pitfalls and develop your own powerful voice.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is “voice?” and Why is it so important?
b) How do you find your own? How do you develop it?
c) Word Choice
d) Putting it All Together
Class Activity: This class uses exercises to help each participant weed out the outside noise and find their own authentic voice. Be sure to bring paper and pen or a laptop; for each exercise we'll use a couple examples from the class.



An Open Class Discussion covering Elmore Leonard’s 10 Rules of Writing which have inspired authors for years. Leonard’s rules, like his style, are simple, direct and effective. We’ll talk about each of them, discuss their strengths and weaknesses, why they’re used and how and when to break them, all in the exploration of the invisible author.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) The place of the author in his/her own text
b) Dialog and Description
c) Adverbs and audience manipulation
d) Exclamation Points!!!!

Whether you've snagged the agent of your dreams or are still looking, Lit Agent Terri Baranowski discusses what to expect from your agent and what your agent expects from you in this powerful workshop designed to maximize the workability and success of your author/agent relationship.

How to conceptualize your book cover, target your audience, and capitalize on that all-important first impression.

A history of Jewelry: what people wore, and why they did.
This class will cover jewelry and ornamentation from ancient times (roughly 40,000 years) to modern times. We will discuss the composition, creation, and design of the items, as well as what they mean when people wear them.



Bad guys are more believable when they have a purpose that's more than just "I want to take over the world because I'm a jerk." They need to have a reason for acting the way they do and they have to believe they're the heroes of the story.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Sympathy through Backstory
b) Present Motivation
c) But still evil



Learn how to look for and render the unique characteristics that each person has. Along the way you will also see methods for blending, erasing and using conte with your charcoal.



No man is an island, nor can your protagonist be. Good side characters do more than just keep your hero company on the road to victory. Learn the various roles supporting characters fill, and how to craft sidekicks, love interests, and nemeses that your reader will never forget.

Come and learn why Scriveneris the most versatile writing program out there. Come learn how to use Scrivener. How to use a template. How to add chapters and sections. How to add notes, photos and more.

How can you write believable historical fiction or fantasy that includes swordplay if you’ve never wielded an actual sword? Do you know the difference between a long sword and a great sword? A saber and a rapier? How about the difference between a thrusting spear, a throwing spear, and a hewing spear? How heavy is a mace or a war hammer, and how hard is it to swing one? Why is the butt-cap one of the greatest military inventions of all time? Did you know that a flail (think spiked ball on the end of a chain and handle) is actually a farming implement? Why is the idea of a three-foot long bronze sword wielded by an eleven-year-old (e.g., “Riptide” in the “Percy Jackson” series) laughable? How heavy is a suit of chain vs. plate, and how hard is it move, much less fight wearing armor? This is a HANDS-ON demonstration of various types of swords, axes, spears, and other weapons and armor, ranging from the Bronze Age to the 20th Century, from copper to bronze to high-carbon steel. Participants will have the opportunity to handle and heft actual weapons, don armor, and learn how such items were employed.

Flashbacks are tricky. If used incorrectly, they interrupt the forward momentum of the story, causing readers to lose interest. But when used correctly, they can increase suspense and deepen the reader’s attachment to the character. In this class, you will learn the different types offlashbacks, when to use them, where to begin a story, a short intro to fractals, and how to avoid repetitions.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Flashbacks defined
b) How to use flashbacks effectively
c) How to avoid descriptive patterns
d) Where to begin a story

What role playing games taught one author about character management. Simple techniques to control your characters through record keeping, association and inspiration. Tools to maintain consistency and visualize relationships as an aid to fleshing out believable characters. Indispensable strategies to maintaining continuity across series through simple bookkeeping and pre-writing.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Power of record keeping and story telling
b) Long term writing records
c) Identifying necessary and unnecessary characters
d) Character arcs and relationship to the story



How is food used in writing and how can we use food to market our books.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) How familiar we are with food in writing even if we don't think about it.
b) How and why do we use food in our writing.
c) How we take the food used in our writing and market with it.

Storytelling Festival- Come be a part of oral tradition as three of Utah’s best storytellers share their talent and skill to entertain and delight you!

1:30-2:30- Julie Barnson- The Light Princess
2:30-3:30- George McEwan
3:30-4:30- Rachel Hedman

Julie Barnson loves to tell stories! She has worked as a professional storyteller for twelve years in Utah. She shares stories that delight and sometimes terrify her audience with her love of fairy tales and ghost stories. She is a Master Story Facilitator for the Story Crossroads storytelling festival and teaches storytelling to her fourth grade classes at Riverside Elementary school.

George McEwan is armed with the experience of a misspent childhood and frequent international travel mishaps, and it’s hard to tell truth from the tall tales he spins. He currently is three-time winner of “Utah’s Biggest Liar” through the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival.

As family folklore expert and youth storytelling advocate, Rachel Hedman looks to the future by first looking in the home. She promotes positive communication and relationships through the Folktales About Families Series. Sometimes Rachel adopts musicians, singers, dancers and tellers for programs. Currently she is Storyteller Chair of the Weber State University Storytelling Festival.

Explore how to create fantasy creatures and how to use basic body structure to create new creatures.



In this class we’ll analyze several Pixar films and discover what drives their popularity, then learn how to take those effects from the screen and apply them to writing in any genre. If you want to add depth and meaning to your prose, this class is for you

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Emotional authenticity
b) How to make standard plots feel new and different
c) Developing of unique characters that have wide appeal
Class Activity: Teach about the points using examples from several movies and then have the class use what they learn to dissect a Pixar movie.

Join Swede Larson for an exploration of the delights and dangers of the real world under our feet.

Learn how applying deep POV to your fiction will allow you to accomplish more for your story and POV character in less words. This presentation teaches how POV voice helps you to describe and give exposition to the reader without boring them or creating info dumps.

It has never been so easy to publish; it has never been so difficult to find readers. Learn how to cut through the marketing noise and find people who appreciate and, even better, buy your work. With specific online marketing knowledge and elbow grease, you can grow your author email list by 5,000 or more within six months. Learn how to position your book for better Amazon rankings. Learn how to turn your author website into a fan-base building machine

Where do the runes come from and how do we know what we know about them?
What is their form and function in practical use?
Why are they still relevant?

Deepen your fantasy and science fiction stories with different languages! I've lived in Italy, Germany, and Japan, plus traveled in 20+ other countries. Come listen to my many (and often embarrassing) stories of language barriers and be inspired for your own stories.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Trying to communicate when you know some basics
b) Trying to communicate when you nothing of their language
c) Trying to communicate when you need help fast but can't speak the local language
Class Activity: Practice not being able to understand English and can only communicate via body language.

Lydia Lyman and Kris Langman are taking us on a ghost adventure of their own. As the owners of M&L Paranormal they will take us through the details of a ghost hunt and what they find when they try and contact the other side. These spunky gals will teach us what we as authors should do better when writing about the paranormal, and give us a few tricks of the trade!

Cinderella never wore black leather, can't fight, can't save herself, yet she survived a horribly abusive situation with grace, humor, and love. Was she strong? Depends on the definition.

What is an author's voice? Voice is an important part of who you are as a writer and can take a humdrum novel and make it stand out in a crowd. We'll talk about what voice is and how you can develop your own.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Defining Author's Voice: What it is and what it isn't.
b) Why think about author's voice? Why it's an important part of your writing.
c) How can you develop your author's voice? Exercises and tips for developing a killer voice.

We'll explore a few different archetypes of story structure, and then apply our understanding of those structures to our own stories, hopefully coming to a deeper understanding of the stories we are trying to tell.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) The Hero's Journey
b) The Virgin's Promise
c) Dan Harmon's 8- Structure
d) Foolscap Method
e) What can we learn?

A Triage of your first pages so that you have the best chance to hook your reader and make them want to read the rest. Award winning authors Bob Deffendi and Dan Willis will go through your first 10 pages and help you focus your ideas for maximum effect. Improve your first line, your first page, and bring your inciting incident into sharp focus. This workshop will be a small group, of participants only, where you’ll read your first few pages aloud and get feedback from the authors and from the group. Bob and Dan will also provide you with a written critique of your work. Chapters must be submitted in advance, spaces are limited.

You've sculpted your masterpiece, now how do you make copies? This class teaches you how to easily and affordably make copies of your creations for fun or profit.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Casting materials
b) Mold making Techniques
c) Different types of casting
d) Safety and how not to die doing this
Class Activity: Students will have the opportunity to create their own copies of sculpture during the class period.





Panel discussion with Charles D. Moisant, Philo Barnhart

Neil Gaiman said, "Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.” Come turn your own problems into dragons, demons, or other monsters through writing, and learn how to defeat them.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Classic and popular examples of monster slaying/problem solving in sci-fi and fantasy
b) Imagery behind certain monsters; what's best for your personal demons?
c) Create your own monsters
d) Finding ways to slay your problems now that they're in corporeal form
Class exercises: Create your own monsters and learn how to defeat them



How to writeserial fiction and keep your audience turning pages. The art of the hook, anchoring your story, and reintroducing great characters along the way which will help you tap into this vital growing market.

Every writer has the goal to publish, though few are as prepared as they should be. Expectations for what being “published” means are, quite often, very narrowly focused. This class will help widen that gaze and help every aspiring writer be better prepared for what’s facing them when that fateful day of getting an offer arrives.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) It’s Not all About Writing/Opportunities Come out of nowhere
b) The Contract is not the finish line
c) On The Editing Process
d) It is YOUR Story
e) Conferences and Marketing
f) Managing your time – Dealing with the emotions associated with being a published author
g) In the end, keep on Writing
h) It’s also a business





this class will walk upcoming artists through the process of using their own photos to generate the otherworldly and fantastical.

As literature becomes more auditory, there's been a boom in Created Languages: Conlangs. Dothraki, Klingon, Elvish, Skyrim, Despicable Me Minions to name just a few. Learn how to design a believable Conlang for your world, when to use or not use it, and where to get ideas for making your Conlang stand out.

Come learn what makes a good fight scene, whether its close hand to hand combat or the battle field. As a black belt in Jiu Jitzu, weapons, and TaeKwonDo, we will cover what it will take to get your characters sounding like a pro warrior. Also, we'll talk about correct vernacular and avoiding technical terms so anyone can get a feel for what your fight scene is all about!

Best opening lines - examples and how to write them. Elevator pitches-good and bad examples. What "hooks" you with a story? What keeps you interested and engaged until the end?

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) The Hook -- how to get people immediately interested in your story.
b) The Line -- how not to be boring after the hook
c) The Sinker -- great endings, tying everything together, fulfilling promises.



With so many authors and their books flooding today’s market, you need to stand out, but how? Your book may be fantastic, but you’re not selling your book - You’re selling YOU! With his characteristic humor, Jaso King shares tips and suggestions for how to build and market your brand in order to stand out and most importantly – sell books!.


Points the Class Will Cover
a) Definition of a brand

b) Today’s author spends 40% writing 60% promoting

c) Finding your thing.

In this interactive workshop we'll be analyzing excerpts from several pieces of fiction, discussing strategies and challenges involved in doing costume research, summarizing how critics and theorists define genres in fiction that features costume, plus we'll discuss some strengths and weaknesses of analogy, the operating principle underlying many of the choices writers make when building their characters' worlds as well as their wardrobe. If you're creating fiction, you can use many of the same costume research strategies used by performing arts designers when you develop your characters and what they're wearing. To encapsulate all these topics in our final conversation, we want to talk about your specific questions, challenges and triumphs with your own fictional characters and their wearables.

Should you begin with a prologue? What does it mean to start with action or to make your characters earn emotion? Let's discuss how to make your first page so strong it'll wrestle your readers to the ground and hold them there until they've been pinned--er, hooked.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) What makes a strong first page?
b) Different ways of approaching the same first page
c) The goal of a strong first page

Have you ever wanted to write romance or write a romance subplot but you don't know where to start? Maybe your hero and heroine just can't seem to find common ground. Or possibly they just plain do not want to get it together! Whip those characters into shape and learn what it takes to write a romance or romance subplot.

Explore the possibilities of using 3D models to make a real-life plush, from a simple ball with googly-eyes to a 1000-piece dragon. Do's, don'ts, the practicalities and pitfalls of using a 3D modeling program to make patterns.
All ages and experience levels are encouraged to listen in.

Points the Class will cover:
a) What exactly IS a 3D model?
b) 3D to 2D; How to make a sphere flat
c) It's all in the seams
d) How to take this to the extreme; LEDS, teeth, and textures
Class activity: Interacting with props and examples..... lots of props and examples.

Make digital another tool in your artistic toolset. Learn the basics of a straight digital work flow and along the way, pick up some tips and tricks.

Panel discussion with Eric G. Swedin, Jaleta Clegg, Newton Ewell

How do you become an artist when you can’t afford classes or good supplies? Covering how and where to get affordable supplies, internet assets and lessons, Anatomy Anatomy Anatomy, and where to show off what you have made.

Fear is an essential ingredient in almost all stories--even stories that are not scary. Learn how fear plays an important role across all genres.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is fear?
b) Set expectations and limitations.
c) Why will the good guy fight despite obvious odds?
d) Why will the good girl win despite obvious inadequacies?

Want to know how to ramp up the action in your book? Leave the reader begging for more? Write like you're riding a roller coaster. In my class, you'll learn basic techniques for using effective description, dialogue, and elements of world building to keep the reader turning pages!