Welcome to the Teen Track schedule for FyreCon. The schedule will be updated as classes are confirmed with the instructors, so please check back often. We are excited to offer a wide array of classes for our young creators. Adults are welcome to attend the teen track with children, but classes are geared toward teens.

For the Main Schedule, please check here.
For Master Classes, please check here.
For events and other activities, please see this page.
For the Thursday Teen Track Schedule, please check here.
For the Friday Teen Track Schedule, please check here.
For the Saturday Teen Track Schedule, please check here.
The schedule is subject to change until May 20th or in case of emergency.

We are currently working on the Teen Track schedule. Classes will be posted as they are confirmed.

Thursday Teen Track Schedule

TimeBuilding D3
Room 203
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 206
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 207
Art

11:00 Registration (Lobby)
12:00 Registration (Lobby)
12:30 - 1:20pmRandom Story Generators:
Beat Writer's Block or Create Great Writing Prompts
- James Wymore
Everything You Need to Know About Writing & Selling Short Fiction
- M.K. Hutchins
Using Digital Media to Make Traditional Art
- Amberly Berendson
1:30 - 2:20Saying No:
Building Tension Through Dialogue
- Melissa McShane
Webcomic Basics:
What to Know Before You Start
- Aneeka Ricthen
2:30 - 3:20#NoFilter:
Change Your Filter and Free Your Writing
- Ali Cross
Outlining for Teens
- Dan Willis
Tonal Thumbnailing
- Dustin Foran
3:30 - 4:20Plot Bunnies:
Picking an Idea
- Julie Frost
Research and Science for Genre Fiction
- James Wymore
4:30 - 5:20The Un-Put-Downable Book
- Cindy Hogan
How Chainmail is Made
- Scott Bascom
5:30 - 7:30Sibscript Award

Friday Teen Track Schedule

 Building D3
Room 203
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 204
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 205
Art

Building D3
Room 206
Teen
9:00Registration (Lobby)
9:30am - 10:20amVivid Description
- M.K. Hutchins
No More Damsels in Distress
- Wendy Knight
Visual Library:
Importance and Function
- Dustin Foran
Writing Through Life
- Jill Bowers
10:30am-11:20amStory Structure Workshop
- Alyson Peterson
Breaking Through Writer's Block
- Lisa Mangum
Basic Elements of Visual Design
- Jaleta Clegg
11:30am 12:20The Teenage Hero's Journey
- Mikki Kells
Your Journey Into Becoming a Professional Artist
- Heather Theurer
Writing Romance for Teens
- Rebekah R. Ganiere
12:30 - 1:20pmBuilding Better Characters:
The Mr. Potato Head Way
- Lisa Mangum
Who am I?
Creating your Professional Author Bio(s)
- Jana S. Brown
1:30pm - 2:20pmPainting Emotion and Imagery with Word
- Candace Thomas
Flash Fiction
- Jenna Eatough
Designing A Digital Comic for the Web
(Story-Driven Webcomics)
- Aneeka Richins
Choose Your Own Adventure:
Which Path to Publishing Is Right For You?
- Caryn Larrinaga
2:30pm - 3:20pmDiving into Deep Point of View
- Rebecca Blevins
Beginning Scrivener for Teens
- Rebekah R. Ganiere
3:30pm - 4:20pmLook to the Stars:
Creating an Astrology Mythos
- Melissa McShane
Heroes That Wheeze
- Scott William Taylor
Harry Potter as an Acceptable Mary Sue
- Caryn Larrinaga, Dustin Steinacker (M), Michelle Witte
4:30pm-5:20pmComic Books as Literature
- Christopher Husberg
Creative Juice Bar:
A Writing Prompt Worksho
- Terri Baranowski
Diving into Deep Point of View
- Rebecca Blevins
5:30pm -6:20pmCreating Another Wizard That Isn't Another Gandalf, Dumbledoor, ect.
- Scott William Taylor
Characters
-Karen E. Hoover
6:30pm - 7:20pm2D Design Layout
-Rob Carlos

Saturday Teen Track Schedule

 "Building D3
Room 203
Teen Writing
"
Building D3
Room 204
Teen Writing
Building D3
Room 205
9:00Registration (Lobby)
9:30am - 10:20amRoller Coaster Writing
- Frank Cole
Fear as a Story Telling Tool
- Ben Ireland
10:30am-11:20amHook, Line, and Sinker
- Holli Anderson and Jason King
Combat Writing
- Alyson Peterson
11:30am 12:20Dragon Slaying and Other Extreme Sports
- Jill Bowers
The Effects of Japanese Anime on Western Art
- Charles D. Moisant, Philo Barnhart
12:30 - 1:20pmLanguage Barriers
- Aneeka Richins
Maps
- Hraefn Wulfson
1:30pm - 2:20pmTo Infinity and Beyond!
Make Disney Pixar Storytelling Elements
- Rebecca Blevins
2:30pm - 3:20pmBeginning Scrivener for Teens
- Rebekah R. Ganiere
Neville to the Rescue:
Creating Powerful Side Characters
- Caryn Larrinaga
3:30pm - 4:20pmGive Your Bad Guys a Heart
- Wendy Knight
4:30pm-5:20pmVoice Victorious:
Learn to Understand Voice & Define Your Own
- Ali Cross
Backgrounds and Landscapes
- Sean Rick
5:30pm -6:20pmWriting is a Business?
- Mike Glassford
6:30pm - 7:20pm
7:30pm - 8:20pm

A presentation on the history and structure of chainmail from around the world, with a section on how to do it yourself.

The Un-Put-Downable Book: crafting scenes that make it impossible for your readers to put down your book until the very end

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Where to start your book
b) Cause and effect
c) Goal-Conflict-failure
d) Revision with maximum results
e) How to end your book

Readers care about details. In the information age, we have easy access to all the tools that can turn a weak story into something fascinating. This class discusses when it's worth putting in the time to get it right and when you can fudge it without alienating readers. Geared for writers of all genres.


The importance of tone and thumbnail concept development. Live digital demo.


We each go through life with a filter--negative thoughts we tell ourselves--that effects everything we do. As writers, the filters we use can adversely impact our writing and our career. In this class we'll learn to identify the negative filters we regularly use, and how to replace them with the ones that will let the beauty of our stories shine through, freeing us to find the success we deserve.



Good dialogue is more than just two people talking. This class will address the question of what makes dialogue interesting and how it can be used to forward a story. The class will participate in writing dialogues using the techniques discussed.

Nearly everyone who has a computer has some access to digital art tools. Amberly has spent a decade playing with them in traditional art ways and making digital work that stands out. Covering topics such as basic free-pay digital art tools, using brush tools like traditional artists, building digital color on your pencil sketches (your scanner is your friend), printing effects of different papers on digital art.

Come learn the different kids of short fiction, what makes short fiction work, where to find critique partners, and how to sell it in today's market.

Points the class will cover:
a) What short fiction is
b) Why writers write short fiction
c) Tips and tricks for writing short
d) How to decide if your idea suited to a short story or a novel
e) Why critiquing is valuable
f) How to research markets, submit to them, and track your submissions

Need a story, but can’t think of an idea? This simple method of creating tables teaches a great brainstorming technique. Based on Orson Scott Card’s MICE quotient, this system is guaranteed to help you think up a story you can’t stop yourself from writing.





An in-depth discussion of the wonderful world of wizards, what they are/aren't, should/shouldn't be, and just how far can you go with the character.

How do you hook a reader? The answer lies in how to effectively use a deep point of view. We'll discuss varying levels of shallow to medium to deep POV and apply them in a short workshop. Get ready for some hands-on fun!

Points the Class Will Cover
a) What deep point of view is
b) What elements make up a deep point-of-view scene
c) How to choose the number of elements to use to give the reader the experience you wish them to have
d) Which elements are the most effective and which should be used sparingly
e) How to write a scene using those elements
Class Activity: After learning about techniques from my Point-of-View Toolbox, attendees use those tools to help them craft a scene using a scenario we come up with in class.

Whether you want to know where to get ideas or have a chance to write flash fiction, come to this workshop hosted by Literary Agent Terri Baranowski and be prepared to be inspired!

Comics, even today, too often carry with them connotations of immaturity, laziness, and low-brow writing. That could not be further from the truth! In this class we'll discuss why comics are important and powerful. We'll look at a few specific examples of fantastic comics and see what we can learn from them.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Comics as Literature
b) Maus and Watchmen
c) What can we learn?

Heroes mean different things in different eras. What possibly is the most interesting aspect of any hero is their weakness. In this class we'll discuss what makes a hero and what can bring them down.

Astrology is as old as mankind and is endlessly fascinating. Learn how to mine the elements of astrology to create a mythos that can be the basis for your own fantasy world.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) A brief overview of astrology, including some non-Western concepts.
b) How to identify key ideas that will work together to build a mythos.
c) Adding the details to make it unique.
Class Activity: The class will work together to build a mythos from astrological ideas.



How do you hook a reader? The answer lies in how to effectively use a deep point of view. We'll discuss varying levels of shallow to medium to deep POV and apply them in a short workshop. Get ready for some hands-on fun!

Points the Class Will Cover
a) What deep point of view is
b) What elements make up a deep point-of-view scene
c) How to choose the number of elements to use to give the reader the experience you wish them to have
d) Which elements are the most effective and which should be used sparingly
e) How to write a scene using those elements
Class Activity: After learning about techniques from my Point-of-View Toolbox, attendees use those tools to help them craft a scene using a scenario we come up with in class.

You’ve written a book, and you’re ready to share your story. But with so many ways to get your novel into a reader’s hands, how can you decide which path to take? Explore the pros and cons of self-publishing, small presses, the “Big 5” and everything in between.

Come learn about story-driven webcomics and how to jump into this world of storytelling.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Story Beats on a Page
b) Software to Use
c) Running a Webcomic



This workshop with illustrate the use of literary techniques in evolving emotion and feeling in your words. We will focus on abstract concepts, sentence structure, and poetic imagery in creating a captivating connection to any level of reader.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Basic instruction of some literary techniques
b) Using certain literary techniques to focus on sentence structure and voicing
c) Bringing in abstract concepts and poetry to increase the value of the emotions written
d) Capturing how to use emotion

The dreaded author bio, whispered about in the hallways at cons and fretted over behind locked office doors. Come and learn what an author bio is, which ones you need and how to get started. Bring paper, pen and courage and be ready to write about you!

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Short Author bio - It's an elevator pitch for you!
b) Medium Author bio - Book jacket, con phamphlet, web page - no problem
c) Long Author bio - Roll out those professional credentials and impress
d) Places each type of Bio comes into play
Class Activity: Each attendee will create a first version of a short author bio for themselves. We'll read some of these aloud and get feedback until we run out of time. The hopes is to get them on the right path for creating a file of author bios and information which will serve them through their professional careers.

There are lots of ways to build a 3-dimensional character, and in this class, editor and author Lisa Mangum uses the various pieces of a Mr. Potato Head toy (eyes, ears, mouth, arms, legs, feet) as a way to dig deeper into a character's development and back story.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Character building covers both the outer, physical description as well as the inner motivations.
b) You don't need to know everything about your character before you start writing
c) Knowing your characters goals will help you know how to build a plot around them.
Class Activity: Lisa will bring some Mr. Potato Head toys as visual aids (and for students to play with, as needed).

Writing YA Romance is fun and true to the age, but what are the differences between writing romance for teens and writing romance for adults? Come find out what it takes to write a convincing and realistic romance for the YA genre.

Points the Class Will Cover
a) What is a romance?
b) What are the differences between romance for YA and Romance for Adults?
c) What are the tropes for YA romance?



You've learned the Hero's Journey, but as a writer of teen fiction this structure changes from the typical cycle. In this class we'll go through the Teen Journey.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Basic Hero's Journey
b) Structure breakdown
c) Act one for teens
d) Act two for teens
e) Act three for teens
f) Cohesive whole
Class Activity: This class will feature Plotting at least one possible character arc based on Teen Journey of a YA novel already in process or one you are just starting. Come prepared with multiple story ideas.

You don't have to design your own cover, but you should know enough about design to spot a good one. Learn some of the terminology and elements of visual design, then put them to the test on real book covers and interior layout.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Basic elements of visual design - white space, balance, color choice, etc
b) Book cover design - how is it different than other things like brochures, postcards, posters, etc?
c) interior layout - what makes it easy for the reader to read?
d) eBook design vs. print book design

Many authors struggle with writer's block--that dreaded feeling of not know where your story is going or how to get there. But there are ways to get through it, and editor and author Lisa Mangum will share 7 tips on how to get past the block and keep your story on track.

Want to know where to write that critical scene? Not sure how to move your plot forward? Do you pants your story too much? In this Story Structure class we will go over pacing, tone, and solid and organic outlines to make your novel work. Breaking down the three part story structure into b-stories, climatic midpoints, and villainous interventions, we will talk about the story solutions to get you from page one to The End.

Writing is more than fun; it can save us. The Writing Through Life class teaches how some of the fundamentals of writing can help us deal with problems we face in our day-to-day lives. Learn to "write your own deliverance" (Hamilton) by coming to this class!

Discussion of the Visual Library concept with examples of how it makes a difference
a) Visual Library: what is it?
b) How to use the Visual Library
c) Expanding the Library
Class Activity: Interactive discussion through the use of slides and sketchbooks.

How to write a believable but relatable heroine.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) How to write a believable but relatable heroine
b) Tough doesn't always mean Tomboy
c) Triumph over demons
Class activity: Character development: create a female lead character, get to know her, and give her skills to save herself that she will learn during the course of the story.

Learn how to write vivid description that enhances your characters and your plot. Bring a laptop or paper and pencil -- we're going to practice!

You finished your book and you are ready to sell it! What do you do now? What steps have you taken to start and run your business? Let's make business fun again.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Business Formation
b) Business Operation
c) Contracts



With hands-on exercises, learn to identify point-of-view pitfalls and develop your own powerful voice.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is “voice?” and Why is it so important?
b) How do you find your own? How do you develop it?
c) Word Choice
d) Putting it All Together
Class Activity: This class uses exercises to help each participant weed out the outside noise and find their own authentic voice. Be sure to bring paper and pen or a laptop; for each exercise we'll use a couple examples from the class.

Bad guys are more believable when they have a purpose that's more than just "I want to take over the world because I'm a jerk." They need to have a reason for acting the way they do and they have to believe they're the heroes of the story.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Sympathy through Backstory
b) Present Motivation
c) But still evil

No man is an island, nor can your protagonist be. Good side characters do more than just keep your hero company on the road to victory. Learn the various roles supporting characters fill, and how to craft sidekicks, love interests, and nemeses that your reader will never forget.



In this class we’ll analyze several Pixar films and discover what drives their popularity, then learn how to take those effects from the screen and apply them to writing in any genre. If you want to add depth and meaning to your prose, this class is for you

Points the Class Will Cover
a) Emotional authenticity
b) How to make standard plots feel new and different
c) Developing of unique characters that have wide appeal
Class Activity: Teach about the points using examples from several movies and then have the class use what they learn to dissect a Pixar movie.



Deepen your fantasy and science fiction stories with different languages! I've lived in Italy, Germany, and Japan, plus traveled in 20+ other countries. Come listen to my many (and often embarrassing) stories of language barriers and be inspired for your own stories.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Trying to communicate when you know some basics
b) Trying to communicate when you nothing of their language
c) Trying to communicate when you need help fast but can't speak the local language
Class Activity: Practice not being able to understand English and can only communicate via body language.

Neil Gaiman said, "Fairy tales are more than true: not because they tell us that dragons exist, but because they tell us that dragons can be beaten.” Come turn your own problems into dragons, demons, or other monsters through writing, and learn how to defeat them.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) Classic and popular examples of monster slaying/problem solving in sci-fi and fantasy
b) Imagery behind certain monsters; what's best for your personal demons?
c) Create your own monsters
d) Finding ways to slay your problems now that they're in corporeal form
Class exercises: Create your own monsters and learn how to defeat them



Best opening lines - examples and how to write them. Elevator pitches-good and bad examples. What "hooks" you with a story? What keeps you interested and engaged until the end?

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) The Hook -- how to get people immediately interested in your story.
b) The Line -- how not to be boring after the hook
c) The Sinker -- great endings, tying everything together, fulfilling promises.

Fear is an essential ingredient in almost all stories--even stories that are not scary. Learn how fear plays an important role across all genres.

Points the Class Will Cover:
a) What is fear?
b) Set expectations and limitations.
c) Why will the good guy fight despite obvious odds?
d) Why will the good girl win despite obvious inadequacies?

Want to know how to ramp up the action in your book? Leave the reader begging for more? Write like you're riding a roller coaster. In my class, you'll learn basic techniques for using effective description, dialogue, and elements of world building to keep the reader turning pages!